Don't let your accent
keep you from your
dreams.


The adverbs so, too, neither and either are frequently used when agreeing with a statement that has been made by another person. So, and too are always used when agreeing with a positive statement. Neither and either are always used when agreeing with a negative statement.

The main verb used with these adverbs is determined by the verb used in the initial statement. If a form of the to be verb is used in the initial statement then to be must be used in the statement of agreement. Likewise, if a model auxiliary such as can is used then a model must be used in the agreeing statement. All other verbs require the use of do in the agreeing statement. See the following chart.

Verbs -to be- modelsall other verbs
initial statement I'm hungry. I can eat spicy food. I like chicken.
agreement using so So am I. So can I. So do I.
agreement using too I am, too. I can, too. I do, too.
Verbs -to be- models all other verbs
initial statement I'm not very hungry. I can't drink soju. I don't like chicken.
agreement using neither Neither am I. Neither can I. Neither do I.
agreement using either I'm not either. I can't either. I don't either.

Also, notice the position of the adverbs so, too, neither and either.

So and neither are both at the beginning of the phrase.

Too and either are both at the end of the phrase.