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The most basic simple sentence contains only one subject and one verb.

For example, in the sentence;I like watching movies in my free time., the subject is I and the verb is like.

Simple sentences containing only one subject verb combination are actually very rare in everyday English. As your English improves, you will want to start using sentences that are more complex and varied. To make your writing more interesting, you should try to use the following sentence constructions.

Two subjects and one verb (SSV)- compound subject and simple verb
My friend and I went shopping yesterday. subject 1 = My friend, subject 2 = I, verb = went
One subject and two verbs (SVV)- simple subject and compound verb
My wife has a good job and makes a lot of money. subject = My wife, verb 1 = has, verb 2 = makes
Two subjects and two verbs (SSVV)- compound subject and compound verb
Jim and Micheal like playing computer games and enjoy watching videos.subject 1 = Jim, subject 2 = Micheal, verb 1 = like, verb 2 = enjoy
Structure

The simple sentences in examples 1, 2, and 3 above where created by joining two or more simple sentences together.

In example number 1, My friend and I went shopping yesterday., there are two subjects and one verb.

My friend went shopping yesterday. (Subject: My friend + verb went + shopping yesterday.)

I went shopping yesterday. (Subject: I + verb went + shopping yesterday.)

Notice that the verb went and shopping yesterday are in both sentences.

When the two sentences are joined, went shopping yesterday only needs to be written once.

By joining the two subjects and adding the verb went and shopping yesterday, we create the sentence,

My friend and I went shopping yesterday.

Combining Simple Sentences

The sentences in this section were created from simple sentences using simple subjects and simple objects. They were combined using the conjunctions and and or.

and used to connect simple sentences that are positive.
Examples
I like swimming.
I like water skiing.
I like swimming and water skiing.
orused to connect simple sentences that are negative.
I don't like football.
I don't like basketball.
I don't like football or basketball.
oralso used to connect two or more alternatives or choices.
usage
Used most often to form questions.
Examples
Do you want to go out tonight?
Do you want to stay home tonight?
Do you want to go out or stay home tonight?

Practice

Part A. Read the sentences below. What is the structure of each sentence? Write each sentence on a piece of paper and then write its structure next to the sentence. Each sentence will be either simple subject - simple verb (SV), compound subject and simple verb (SSV), simple subject and compound verb (SVV), or compound subject and compound verb (SSVV). When you are finished, check your answers by clicking on the sentence..

  1. I can say hello in five languages.

  2. My brother and his friend play hockey together.

  3. In his free time, Jim likes running and enjoys playing tennis.

  4. Mary and Jane went to dinner and saw a movie last night.

Part B. On a piece of paper, join the following simple sentences using either and or or. Click on the first sentence to check your answers.

  1. Should we go see a movie? Should we go see a play?

  2. I didn't go to history class today. I didn't go to geometry class today.

  3. Bruce Willis starred in the movie we saw last night. Meg Ryan starred in the movie we saw last night.

  4. Bob likes to exercise and works out often. Jim likes to exercise and works out often.

Take the quiz.